Monday, September 24, 2007

Womby Vaultages in Literature

From Henry V, Act 2, Scene 4:
DAUPHIN

For the Dauphin,
I stand here for him: what to him from England?

EXETER

Scorn and defiance; slight regard, contempt,
And any thing that may not misbecome
The mighty sender, doth he prize you at.
Thus says my king; an' if your father's highness
Do not, in grant of all demands at large,
Sweeten the bitter mock you sent his majesty,
He'll call you to so hot an answer of it,
That caves and womby vaultages of France
Shall chide your trespass and return your mock
In second accent of his ordnance.
How Shakespeare knew about womby vaultages four hundred years ago remains a mystery. What did he mean by the phrase? Scholars still seek answers to this, the greatest unanswered question about the Bard.

8 comments:

VikingMoose said...

most excellent.
most womby.

Pro Libertate said...

Und blinky.

Urkobold® said...

THE URKOBOLD ADDED THAT PHRASE. FRANCIS WAS BUSY WITH NOVUM ORGANUM AND NEEDED SOME WORDSMITHERY.

Pro Libertate said...

Really? That explains a few things.

Anonymous said...

http://www.reason.com/blog/show/121722.html#756183

Pro Libertate said...

Yep, that's where "womby vaultages" got its start. Hard to believe it's been so many weeks.

Pro Libertate said...

Soon, "womby vaultages" will belong to Urkobold, and no longer to Francis Bacon. Already, the first four Google results are the Urkobold's or one of his minion's

Excellent.

Anonymous said...

It's hypnotic. I haven't seen blinking text since Ought-One!